2015-2016 Colloquium Lecture Series Archive

Provided below are the 2015-2016 academic year College of Optical Sciences Colloquium lectures. The current lecture series can be found on the main Colloquium page.

2015-2016

  • Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 4:45pm

  • Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "Soft Nano-Photonic Systems: Nanolenses for On-Chip Holographic Imaging of Nanoparticles and Viruses"

    The fabrication of nanophotonic elements out of soft materials provides new frontiers for the integration of photonics with biosystems, and provides ways to realize microscopic devices that could not be made otherwise. Here we present one example: a nanoparticle and virus imaging platform...

  • Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    “Information Optimal Imaging: Detection, Classification and Adaptation”

    Natural scenes/objects exhibit smoothness/correlation at multiple scales and across multiple dimensions that leads to compressible representations. This “compressibility” aspect has been very successfully exploited in image/video compression (e.g. JPEG and JPEG2000, MPEG) and more...

  • Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "Democratization of Next-Generation Imaging, Sensing and Diagnostics Tools through Computational Photonics"

    My research focuses on the use of computation/algorithms to create new optical microscopy, sensing, and diagnostic techniques, significantly improving existing tools for probing micro- and nano-objects while also simplifying the designs of these analysis tools. In this presentation, I will...

  • Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "On the Outside Looking In: Shaking Up Biomedical Imaging with Light, Sound, and Electricity"

    The interaction of different forms of energy can be exploited for novel contrast in biomedical imaging. This colloquium will explore special effects with light, sound and radiofrequencies that enable imaging of optical absorbers in tissue, volumetric mapping of current source densities in the...

  • Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "Panoramic Imaging with Spherically-Symmetric Optics"

    Most wide-angle digital cameras use complex lens systems, such as a retro-telephoto "fisheye" lens, and detect the image formed on a single CMOS focal plane. But wide-angle film cameras based on concentric spherical surfaces date back to the 19th century, and such "...

  • Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "Investigation of Thermoacoustic Effect and Its Applications"

    Thermoacoutsic effect describes the generation of acoustic waves from incident electromagnetic energy due to differential heat generation and absorption in an object. Thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) is a promising candidate for many biomedical applications including breast cancer detection. The...

  • Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "Single Photon Detection Using Superconductors: Progress and Promise"

    Single-photon detectors are increasingly becoming an essential tool for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry, biology, communications, medicine, and remote sensing.   Ideally, a single photon detector generates a measurable signal only when a single photon is absorbed....

  • Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "Computational Imaging and Illumination for Three Dimensional Imaging: Research at the NU Comp Photo Lab"

    Computational imaging and illumination plays a central role in many modern three-dimensional imaging techniques. In this talk, I will provide an overview of several 3D imaging technologies pioneered by the NU Comp Photo Lab, highlighting 3 main research projects. First, I will...

  • Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    “Image Science in Medical and Security Applications”

    Image science is a growing field of study that attempts to understand every aspect of the imaging chain from the physical principles governing the interactions between light and matter to the evaluation of images by physicians, scientists, or algorithms.  Taking this broad viewpoint ensures...

  • Thursday, December 3, 2015 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    "Optics for the OSIRIS-REx Mission"

    OSIRIS-REx is a University of Arizona led NASA mission that will travel to an Earth crossing asteroid (Bennu), study it for a year, collect a sample and return it to Earth. The spacecraft’s payload includes a full complement of remote-...

  • Thursday, January 28, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Spatially reconfigurable photonic systems: from Spatial Light Modulators to active metasurfaces

    The ability to shape and control the wavefront of propagating light beams is of fundamental importance in science and technology. A large variety of optical elements, such as lenses and spatial light modulators, achieve this by introducing local changes in the phase or amplitude of a propagating...

  • Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Instantaneous Dispersion: a Window into Property Relationships for Optical Glass

    Optical applications in the 21st century are rapidly evolving, and materials with new capabilities are needed. Applications covering wide wavelengths ranges are a particular challenge as materials can behave very differently in the ultra-violet, visible and infrared spectral regions....

  • Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Leveraging Advances in Computational Electrodynamics to Enable New Kinds of Nanophotonic Devices

    Advances in computational electrodynamics have the potential to enable fundamentally new kinds of nanophotonic devices which are based principally on complex, non-analytical wave-interference effects. Powerful, flexible, open-source software tools have now been made available for use in large-...

  • Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Analysing and Controlling the Atmospherewith High Intensity Lasers

    Filamentation of multi TW-class lasers opened new perspectives in atmospheric research1. Laser filaments are self-sustained light structures of typically 100 um diameter and up to hundreds of meters in length, widely extending the traditional linear diffraction limit. They stem from...

  • Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Holographic Applications in Medical Imaging and Photovoltaic Energy Systems

    Volume holographic optical elements have a number of features that can provide new functionality to optical systems. In this presentation a review of some of these features will be presented. Following the introduction two different systems with very different requirements will be considered and...

  • Thursday, March 31, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Turbocharged Adaptive Optics in the Era of “Free” Computation

    In the early days of adaptive optics (AO), the throttle that limited both performance and access to the technology by a broad user community was the cost of the necessary high-speed computers. These days, thanks to Gordon Moore’s Law, computing hardware is essentially free: its cost is...

  • Thursday, April 7, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Schlieren and Shadowgraph Optical Instruments

    The schlieren technique is basically a Fourier optical processor lookingat phase distortions caused by transparent phenomena.  By spatiallyfiltering the Fourier spectrum (most often by a Hilbert transform),gradients of phase become amplitude images that can be photographed andanalyzed....

  • Thursday, April 14, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Computational Microscopy for Gigapixel-Scale Imaging

    This talk will describe computational imaging methods for fast capture of gigapixel-scale 3D intensity and phase images in a commercial microscope. Our experimental setups employ illumination-side and detection-side coding of angle (Fourier) space with simple hardware and fast acquisition times...

  • Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Mueller Polarimetry of Structured and Random Media: Numerical Modeling and Applications

    The studies of polarized light interaction with a matter provide valuable information about the sample that can be used in a broad range of applications starting from metrological characterization of thin solid films to cancer detection and staging.  The basic advantages of polarimetric...

  • Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Adaptive architectures for spectral processing

    Introducing adaptive components into the architectures of optical sensor systems facilitates powerful new modes of operation that blend acquisition and exploitation. In this talk I will discuss three spectral applications where my group has experimentally validated gains that arise from such...