2020-2021 Colloquium Lecture Series Archive

Provided below are the 2020-2021 academic year Wyant College of Optical Sciences Colloquium lectures. The current lecture series can be found on the main Colloquium page.

2020-2021

  • Thursday, August 27, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: George Barbastathis Topic: AI-enhanced vision: seeing the invisible Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    If you point your camera to a scene, and the camera registers nothing—does it mean that
    nothing was really there? Hardly! The camera pixels measure “raw” light intensity where the
    encoded information often is much richer than a human observer could tell...
  • Thursday, September 3, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Jonathan Fan  Topic: Data Driven Strategies in Inverse Electromagnetics Design Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    In this talk, I will discuss new advances in the inverse design of freeform electromagnetic devices. My
    focus will be on a new optimization strategy based on global topology optimization networks, termed
    GLOnets, in which the global optimization process is reframed as the...
  • Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Harry Atwater  Topic: Three Grand Challenges for Nanophotonics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Research in nanophotonics, the science of light-matter interactions below the optical wavelength scale, is yielding advances that are opening paths for conceptually new “grand challenge” photonic technologies that have not previously been achievable.  I will discuss three...

  • Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Hatice Altug  Topic: Nanophotonics: Enabling Technology for Next-Generation Biosensors  Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    New healthcare initiatives with global health, precision medicine and point-of-care diagnostics are demanding breakthrough developments in biosensing and bioanalytical tools. Current biosensors are lacking precision, bulky, and costly, as well as they require long detection times, sophisticated...

  • Thursday, September 24, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Tom Baer  Topic: “Optics and Photonics in the COVID 19 and climate change era” Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    The global challenges of the  COVID 19 pandemic and the longer term effects of climate change require coordinated efforts by the scientific and engineering communities to provide accurate information to government officials to guide them as they put in place evidenced-based governmental...

  • Thursday, October 1, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Hui Cao Topic: Mesoscopic Optics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Random scattering of light, e.g., in paint, cloud and biological tissue, is a common process of both fundamental interest and practical relevance. The interference of multiply scattered waves leads to remarkable phenomena in mesoscopic physics such as Anderson localization and universal...

  • Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Mark Schnitzer Topic: Optical imaging of brain dynamics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Optical techniques have become central to research at the forefront of brain science and are still rapidly increasing in their breadth and importance to the field. For instance, the U.S. BRAIN Initiative has as one of its priorities the aim of fostering continued innovation in this domain. I...

  • Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Marin Soljacic Topic: New physics from photonic systems Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive Recorded Video is on Temporary Internal Release Only

    Nanophotonics offers unprecedented opportunities to mold the flow of light: novel material-systems can thus be implemented in which laws of physics can be tailored almost at will. I will describe this on a few recent examples from our work: non-Abelian topology, new framework for understanding...

  • Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Ed Boyden Topic: Optical Tools for Analyzing and Repairing Complex Biological Systems Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    To enable the understanding and repair of complex biological systems, such as the brain, we are creating novel optical tools that enable molecular-resolution maps of such systems, as well as technologies for observing and controlling high-speed physiological dynamics in such systems.  First...

  • Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 4:00pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Andrei Faraon  Topic: Towards optical quantum networks based on rare-earth ions and nano-photonics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive Video Recording: Available internally upon request

    Optical quantum networks for distributing entanglement between quantum machines will enable distributed quantum computing, secure communications and new sensing methods. These networks will contain quantum transducers for connecting computing qubits to travelling optical photon qubits, and...

  • Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Euan McLeod Topic: Soft-Material Nanophotonic Systems. Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    I will present our group’s recent research into soft nanophotonic systems: the interaction of light with systems of nanometer-scale components in soft materials like liquids, colloids, or polymers. We have developed an optical positioning and linking (OPAL) approach for assembling 3D...

  • Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Boubacar Kante  Topic: Topological light sources and sensors Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive This recording has not been approved for public release.

    Topology plays a fundamental role in contemporary physics and enables new information processing schemes and wave device physics with built-in robustness. Recently, significant efforts have been devoted to transposing topological principles to bosonic systems. In the first part of this talk, I...

  • Thursday, December 3, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Shanhui Fan   Topic: Computing with photonic structures Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Photonic structures naturally compute. In particular, any linear photonic structure performs matrix-vector multiplications. This capability is becoming increasingly important in recent years, due in particular to the interests in implementing neural network algorithms, where the cost of matrix-...

  • Thursday, January 14, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Katie Bouman Topic: Designing the Future of Black Hole Imaging Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    This talk will present the methods and procedures used to capture an image of a black hole from the Event Horizon Telescope, as well as discuss future developments for black hole imaging. Imaging a black hole’s structure requires us to reconstruct images from sparse, noisy, measurements...

  • Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Alexander Gaeta Topic: Chip-Based Optical Frequency Combs Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Optical frequency combs have emerged as an important tool for numerous applications in time-frequency metrology, spectroscopy, microwave generation, and data communications.  Recent work has shown that such combs can be generated on a photonic chip using lasers with milliwatt power levels....

  • Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Jelena Vuckovic Topic:Scalable photonics: an optimized approach Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Classical and quantum photonics with superior properties can be implemented in a variety of
    old (silicon, silicon nitride) and new (silicon carbide, diamond) photonic materials by
    combining state of the art optimization and machine learning techniques (photonics inverse...
  • Thursday, February 4, 2021 - 3:30pm - 4:00pm
    Speaker: Alfredo Dubra Topic: Adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy: a trove of optical design challenges Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Imaging the living retina at the microscopic scale presents a number of interesting optical design and wavefront correction challenges. High resolution retinal imaging requires considering not only the performance of ophthalmoscopes, but also that of the eye, which is a complex optical system in...

  • Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Prineha Narang Topic: Predicting and Controlling Correlated Light-Matter Interactions in Quantum Systems Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    The physics of quantum matter hosts spectacular excited-state and nonequilibrium effects, but many of these phenomena remain challenging to control and, consequently, technologically under-explored. My group’s research, therefore, focuses on how quantum systems behave, particularly away...

  • Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Michel Digonnet Topic: Cooling Fiber Lasers with Anti-Stokes Fluorescence Zoom Link to Attend - https://arizona.zoom.us/j/94012959093 Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Few technologies have had the far-reaching global impact of rare-earth-doped fibers, especially in the context of fiber lasers, which are now critical to many scientific disciplines and industries ranging from communication systems to high-precision sensing and chip manufacturing. A persistent...

  • Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm

  • Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker:Alejandro Rodriguez Topic: Physical Limits on Light Scattering: A Complement to Inverse Design Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Spurred by continued advances in computational methods, nanofabrication, and material
    synthesis, development of general-purpose electromagnetic solvers have been principally
    driven by the tantalizing possibility of accessing the full wave physics contained in Maxwell...
  • Thursday, March 11, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm

  • Thursday, March 18, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Marko Loncar Topic: Integrated Lithium Niobate Photonics Zoom Link to Attend - https://arizona.zoom.us/j/94012959093 Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Lithium niobate (LN) is an “old” material with many applications in optical and microwave technologies, owing to its unique properties that include large second order nonlinear susceptibility, large piezoelectric response, and wide optical transparency window. Conventional discrete...

  • Thursday, March 25, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Alireza Marandi Topic:“Optical Parametric Oscillators and their Networks: New Opportunities for Photonic Sensing and Computing” Zoom Link to Attend - https://arizona.zoom.us/j/94012959093 Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have powered a wide range of quantum and classical experiments in the past 50 years. Recent advances in understanding their complex nonlinear dynamical behaviors as well as the experimental progress in implementation of large-scale networks of them have...

  • Thursday, April 8, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Kaushik Sengupta Topic: “Universally Programmable Chip-scale TeraHertz Systems: A New Design Paradigm and New Opportunities” Zoom Link to Attend - https://arizona.zoom.us/j/94012959093 Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    The last decade has seen tremendous advances in THz science and technology across a wide range of substrates from solid-state and photonic devices to 2D and nano-materials. In spite of the progress, the field can greatly benefit from low-cost, integrated, room-temperature technology that can...

  • Thursday, April 15, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Dr. Rebecca Richards-Kortum Topic:  “Biophotonics Solutions to Global Health Challenges” Abstract: This talk will examine the challenges of designing and translating new biophotonics technologies to solve real clinical needs, drawing from examples to improve early detection of cervical cancer for women in Texas and Latin America, to improve point-of-care diagnosis of COVID-19, and to improve newborn survival in African hospitals. The talk will summarize lessons learned to increase the impact and sustainability of the resulting innovations.   Bio: Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Ph.D. is the Rice University Malcolm Gillis University Professor of Bioengineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and she is the Director of Rice 360°: Institute for Global Health, Director of the Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering, and serves as the special advisor to the Provost on health-related research and educational initiatives. Her research has been instrumental in improving early detection of cancers and other diseases, especially in low-resources settings. She is currently working with colleagues and undergraduate students to develop a Nursery of the Future to provide technologies necessary to reduce neonatal death in sub-Saharan Africa to rates equivalent to the United States. Richards-Kortum’s research has led to the development of 40 patents. She is author of the textbook Biomedical Engineering for Global Health (Cambridge University Press, 2010), more than 230 refereed research papers and 11 book chapters. Her teaching programs, research and collaborations have been supported by generous grants from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (with more NIH grants than any other Rice professor), National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Defense, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Whitaker Foundation, and the Virginia and L.E. Simmons Family Foundation. She is a member of numerous academic associations including the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, she has the rare distinction of dual membership in the National Academies. In 2016, The American Institute for Medical and Biomedical Engineering (AIMBE) presented its highest honor, the Pierre Galletti Award to Dr. Richards-Kortum.  In 2008, she was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor and subsequently received a grant for the undergraduate global health program at Rice. This program won the Science Prize for Inquiry-Based Instruction from Science magazine and the Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation.    Zoom Link to Attend - https://arizona.zoom.us/j/94012959093 Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, April 22, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Lambertus (Bert) Hesselink Topic:  “Recent Advances in Differential Phase Contrast 3-D X-ray Imaging with Applications to Medical Imaging and Aviation Security” Zoom Link to Attend - https://arizona.zoom.us/j/94012959093 Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Differential phase contrast imaging can provide direct access to electron density, and dark field (or small angle scatter) contrast enables access to surface and texture details significantly below the detector resolution. These new imaging capabilities...

  • Thursday, April 29, 2021 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm
    Speaker: Nader Engheta Topic:  Structuring Light with Extreme Metamaterials Zoom Link to Attend - https://arizona.zoom.us/j/94012959093 Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Materials are often used to manipulate waves.  Metamaterials have provided far-reaching possibilities in achieving “extremes” in such wave-matter interaction. Various exciting functionalities have been achieved in exploiting metamaterials and metasurfaces in nanophotonics and...