Colloquium

The OSC Colloquium series is a dynamic forum for the interchange of ideas, techniques and research in all areas of optics, wherein academic scholars and industry leaders lead discussions about groundbreaking research and open the floor to questions and comments. Students, faculty members, members of the optics community and the public are all invited to attend.

Colloquium is held on Thursday in Meinel 307 each week during the academic year.

Fall 2020 & Spring 2021 Lectures

  • Thursday, April 29, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Nader Engheta Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, April 22, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Lambertus (Bert) Hesselink Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, April 15, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker:  Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, April 8, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Kaushik Sengupta Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, March 25, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Alireza Marandi Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, March 18, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Marko Loncar Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, March 18, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Marko Loncar Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, March 11, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm

  • Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker:Alejandro Rodriguez Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm

  • Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Michel Digonnet Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Prineha Narang Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, February 4, 2021 - 3:30pm - 4:00pm
    Speaker: Alfredo Dubra Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker:  Topic: Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

  • Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Alexander Gaeta Topic: Chip-Based Optical Frequency Combs Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Optical frequency combs have emerged as an important tool for numerous applications in time-frequency metrology, spectroscopy, microwave generation, and data communications.  Recent work has shown that such combs can be generated on a photonic chip using lasers with milliwatt power levels....

  • Thursday, January 14, 2021 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Katie Bouman Topic: Designing the Future of Black Hole Imaging Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    This talk will present the methods and procedures used to capture an image of a black hole from the Event Horizon Telescope, as well as discuss future developments for black hole imaging. Imaging a black hole’s structure requires us to reconstruct images from sparse, noisy, measurements...

  • Thursday, December 3, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Shanhui Fan   Topic: Computing with photonic structures Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Photonic structures naturally compute. In particular, any linear photonic structure performs matrix-vector multiplications. This capability is becoming increasingly important in recent years, due in particular to the interests in implementing neural network algorithms, where the cost of matrix-...

  • Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Boubacar Kante  Topic: Topological light sources and sensors Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive This recording has not been approved for public release.

    Topology plays a fundamental role in contemporary physics and enables new information processing schemes and wave device physics with built-in robustness. Recently, significant efforts have been devoted to transposing topological principles to bosonic systems. In the first part of this talk, I...

  • Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Euan McLeod Topic: Soft-Material Nanophotonic Systems. Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    I will present our group’s recent research into soft nanophotonic systems: the interaction of light with systems of nanometer-scale components in soft materials like liquids, colloids, or polymers. We have developed an optical positioning and linking (OPAL) approach for assembling 3D...

  • Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 4:00pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Andrei Faraon  Topic: Towards optical quantum networks based on rare-earth ions and nano-photonics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive Video Recording: Available internally upon request

    Optical quantum networks for distributing entanglement between quantum machines will enable distributed quantum computing, secure communications and new sensing methods. These networks will contain quantum transducers for connecting computing qubits to travelling optical photon qubits, and...

  • Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Ed Boyden Topic: Optical Tools for Analyzing and Repairing Complex Biological Systems Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    To enable the understanding and repair of complex biological systems, such as the brain, we are creating novel optical tools that enable molecular-resolution maps of such systems, as well as technologies for observing and controlling high-speed physiological dynamics in such systems.  First...

  • Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Marin Soljacic Topic: New physics from photonic systems Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive Recorded Video is on Temporary Internal Release Only

    Nanophotonics offers unprecedented opportunities to mold the flow of light: novel material-systems can thus be implemented in which laws of physics can be tailored almost at will. I will describe this on a few recent examples from our work: non-Abelian topology, new framework for understanding...

  • Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Mark Schnitzer Topic: Optical imaging of brain dynamics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Optical techniques have become central to research at the forefront of brain science and are still rapidly increasing in their breadth and importance to the field. For instance, the U.S. BRAIN Initiative has as one of its priorities the aim of fostering continued innovation in this domain. I...

  • Thursday, October 1, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Hui Cao Topic: Mesoscopic Optics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Random scattering of light, e.g., in paint, cloud and biological tissue, is a common process of both fundamental interest and practical relevance. The interference of multiply scattered waves leads to remarkable phenomena in mesoscopic physics such as Anderson localization and universal...

  • Thursday, September 24, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Tom Baer  Topic: “Optics and Photonics in the COVID 19 and climate change era” Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    The global challenges of the  COVID 19 pandemic and the longer term effects of climate change require coordinated efforts by the scientific and engineering communities to provide accurate information to government officials to guide them as they put in place evidenced-based governmental...

  • Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Hatice Altug  Topic: Nanophotonics: Enabling Technology for Next-Generation Biosensors  Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    New healthcare initiatives with global health, precision medicine and point-of-care diagnostics are demanding breakthrough developments in biosensing and bioanalytical tools. Current biosensors are lacking precision, bulky, and costly, as well as they require long detection times, sophisticated...

  • Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Harry Atwater  Topic: Three Grand Challenges for Nanophotonics Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    Research in nanophotonics, the science of light-matter interactions below the optical wavelength scale, is yielding advances that are opening paths for conceptually new “grand challenge” photonic technologies that have not previously been achievable.  I will discuss three...

  • Thursday, September 3, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: Jonathan Fan  Topic: Data Driven Strategies in Inverse Electromagnetics Design Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    In this talk, I will discuss new advances in the inverse design of freeform electromagnetic devices. My
    focus will be on a new optimization strategy based on global topology optimization networks, termed
    GLOnets, in which the global optimization process is reframed as the...
  • Thursday, August 27, 2020 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
    Speaker: George Barbastathis Topic: AI-enhanced vision: seeing the invisible Visit our website for future lecture dates and speaker information: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium For a list of our archived lectures: http://www.optics.arizona.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/archive

    If you point your camera to a scene, and the camera registers nothing—does it mean that
    nothing was really there? Hardly! The camera pixels measure “raw” light intensity where the
    encoded information often is much richer than a human observer could tell...