Course Descriptions

The following lists display course descriptions from the UAccess Course Catalog. To locate a specific course easily, use Ctrl + F and type in the OPTI [course number]. 

Undergraduate Level Course Descriptions

OPTI 100H What is Light?

Light is an important aspect of our daily lives, from the lights that we use to see, to the displays that give us information and entertainment, to lasers that are used on optical fibers to transfer information from one place to another. This course will delve into what light is by presenting the technology, phenomena, and systems that we use on daily basis. It starts with our eyes used to view our smartphone or computer displays. The information for these displays is provided via networks, which in the long haul sector use fiber optics, lasers, and other optical subsystems. Along the way we will discuss the three interpretations of light: as a ray (geometrical), as a wave (physical), and as both known as the wave-particle duality (quantum).

OPTI 200 Light, Color and Vision

Explore optical technology and phenomena, including color and vision, light in art and nature, lasers, telescopes, cameras and fiber optics. This course, designed for non-science majors, will feature demonstrations and hands-on learning, with only basic math.

OPTI 201L Geometrical and Instrumental Optics Lab I

This lab is designed to complement the major topics discussed in OPTI 201R, and it is recommended that these two courses be taken concurrently.

OPTI 201R Geometrical and Instrumental Optics I

Basic principles of geometric optics, refraction and reflection, Gaussian optics, paraxial optics, stops and pupils, simple optical instruments.

OPTI 202L Geometrical and Instrumental Optics Lab II

This lab is designed to complement the major topics discussed in OPTI 202R, and it is recommended that these two courses be taken concurrently.

OPTI 202R Geometrical and Instrumental Optics II

Optical instruments, field and relay lenses, telescopes, microscopes, optical materials, achromatization, illumination, cameras, projectors.

OPTI 205 Optics of Photography and Videography

Students completing this course will gain an understanding of the optical principles and sensor technologies that are employed in modern digital cameras, cell phones, and video cameras. They will have been exposed to the history of camera and lens development, and develop an appreciation for how choices of lens, aperture, exposure, and related settings affect the visual impact of the images that are captured. They will have learned the basics of post-acquisition processing software and have an understanding of display technologies ranging from projection to print.

OPTI 210 Physical Optics I

Electromagnetic fields and waves; Fourier series and Fourier transforms; interference and diffraction.

OPTI 280 Computer Programming

An introduction to computer programming and the use of mathematics programs such as Matlab or Mathcad to perform scientific and engineering calculations.

OPTI 306 Radiometry, Sources, and Detectors

The generation, propagation, modification, detection and measurement of optical radiation and the design of radiometric systems.

OPTI 330 Physical Optics II

Linear system theory, Fourier optics, image formation, interference, optical transfer function.

OPTI 340 Optical Design

Use of optical design software, optical materials, aberrations, image evaluation, aberration balancing, design examples

OPTI 340A Introduction to Optical Design

Use and application of optical design software CODE V.

OPTI 341 Semiconductor Physics and Lasers

Compound semiconductors are widely used in photonic components and lasers. This course covers the basic principles of semiconductor physics including: introduction to quantum mechanics; compound semiconductors; direct and indirect bands; p-n junctions; heterojunctions, light absorption and emission; LED and semiconductor lasers.

OPTI 345 Quantum Mechanics and Optical Physics

This course will introduce students to the ideas and methods of quantum theory by building on their knowledge of waves from optics, and developing the tools needed for working with light and matter. After describing the underpinnings of quantum mechanics some key examples will be worked out in detail including the quantum harmonic oscillator. The quantum theory of atomic structure will next be developed in detail to expose the student to some key techniques and notions for understanding atoms. Finally, the interaction between light and matter is explored along with some basic paradigms for understanding optical physics, including Rabi oscillations, spontaneous emission, and the quantum theory of light.

OPTI 370 Lasers and Photonics

Principles of lasers; properties and manipulation of laser light; physical effects and operating principles of photonic components and devices including light modulators, displays, and optical fibers; elements of photonic telecommunications.

OPTI 380A Intermediate Optics Laboratory I

Properties of electromagnetic waves, interference, the Michelson interferometer, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, polarization, Fresnel reflection, Brewster's angle, wave plates, coherent sources and Gaussian beams, laser cavities, gas lasers, and diode lasers.

OPTI 380B Intermediate Optics Laboratory II

Diffraction gratings, spatial filtering, Fourier optics and imaging filtering, electronics (basic analytical instruments, linear and non-linear circuit elements, transistors, op-amps, active filters, oscillators, voltage regulators, logic, gates and flip-flops, counters and registers, data converters, and interfacing with Lab View and Excel).

OPTI 403A Mathematical Methods for Optics & Photonics

This course covers the basic mathematics needed for an in-depth understanding of the science and technology of fiber-optical communication systems. Every mathematical tool/technique developed in this course will first be motivated by the relevant application. The students are not expected to have a broad-based prior knowledge of the topics covered in this course, but they should generally be familiar with the basics of algebra, Euclidean geometry, trigonometry, integral and differential calculus, simple differential equations, and the rudiments of complex number analysis. The course will cover Complex Analysis, Fourier transform theory, and method of stationary phase (in the context of optical diffraction), vector algebra, linear algebra, ordinary and partial differential equations (e.g., Maxwell¿s electrodynamics, wave equation, diffusion equation), special functions (e.g., Bessel functions needed to study the guided modes of optical fibers), and probability theory (needed for understanding various sources of noise in communication systems, photodetection theory, digital communication via noisy channels, Information theory, etc.).

OPTI 404 Optical Spectroscopy of Materials

The course provides a survey of Optical Spectroscopic Methods and underlying phenomena for the study of materials.

OPTI 414A Photovoltaic Solar Energy Systems

This course is intended to provide an introduction to the theory and operation of different types of photovoltaic devices, the characteristics of solar illumination, and the advantages and characteristics of concentrating and light management optics. The physical limits on photovoltaic cell performance and practical device operation will be analyzed. The main device emphasis will focus on different types of silicon photovoltaics including crystalline, amorphous, multi-crystalline, and thin film solar cells. An overview of other types of photovoltaic cells including multi-junction III-V, CdTe, CuInSe2, and organics will also be given. A discussion of radiometric and spectral properties of solar illumination will be presented and the impact of these factors on solar cell design will be explored. Techniques for increasing the performance of solar cells by light trapping, photon recycling, and anti-reflection coatings will be covered. The design and operation of imaging and non-imaging concentrators will also be discussed. Basic experiments related to PV cell measurements and the optical properties of concentrators are also planned for the course.

OPTI 415 Optical Specifications, Fabrication and Testing

Specification of optical components including tolerancing and drawing preparation, material properties, performance metrics; conventional fabrication methods for refractive and reflective optics; optical testing including interferometric testing of surface form and finish, special techniques for aspherics, error analysis, test calibration; and testing of optical systems.

OPTI 416 Modern Astronomical Optics

This course provides an overview of astronomical optical systems and techniques for the observation of exoplanets. It introduces astronomical and optical concepts related to exoplanets observations. By focusing on a particularly challenging observational problem of modern astronomy, the course will teach design and analysis of ultra high precision optical systems and measurement techniques, including spectroscopy, photometry, optical metrology and interferometry.

OPTI 421 Introductory Optomechanical Engineering

Optical materials, principles of opto-mechanical design, lens and mirror mounting, tolerancing, specification of optical components.

OPTI 423 Optomechanical Design and Analysis

Principles that were taught in OPTI 421/521 (Introductory Optomechanical Engineering) will be applied to develop designs and to perform detailed analysis of optomechanical systems.

OPTI 424A Optical Systems Engineering

This class provides opportunities for students to learn practical engineering skills for developing optical systems. Students will work in groups on case studies that provide the opportunity to learn systems engineering skills first-hand. Some of the case studies will look at just the necessary requirements, others will include more detailed design, and two or more will be built by the students using off the shelf optics and mechanics. Some examples of optical applications that may be covered are imaging, spectroscopy, illumination, adaptive optics, communication, detection and metrology. These systems will be used to teach fundamentals of systems engineering, optical system design, quantifying performance for optical systems, debugging hardware and professional engineering skills.

OPTI 430 Optical Communication Systems

Physics of optical communication components and applications to communication systems. Topics include fiber attenuation and dispersion, laser modulation, photo detection and noise, receiver design, bit error rate calculations, and coherent communications.

OPTI 434 Electrical and Optical Properties of Materials

Properties of conductors, insulators, and semiconducting materials as related to crystal structure, interatomic bonding and defect structures.

The course is designed to cover electrical and optical properties of materials including all three materials classifications (conductors, insulators, semiconductors). The course content has covered all of these subject areas for at least 13 years and it recently came to our attention that the course catalog entry was truncated and incorrectly suggests that only one of these discussion areas is covered in the course.

OPTI 439A From Photonics Innovation to the Marketplace

This course covers the process of technology development in the photonics industry, both from the perspective of formal processes and case studies. Key aspects of the commercialization process including intellectual property, new product development processes, technical marketing and team building are treated in an interactive program informed by the instructor¿s 15 years of industry experience in both large corporate R&D organizations and entrepreneurial startups.

OPTI 468 Introduction to Optical Spectroscopy

The objective of this course is to introduce optical spectroscopy methods that widely used in physics, chemistry and biological sciences, provide knowledge for estimating applicability ranges of various methods, and teach basics of planning and designing spectroscopy instruments.

OPTI 469L System Programming for Engineers

The course aims to teach entry to intermediate level software development skills in the LabVIEW programming environment.

LabVIEW is a graphic programming environment that specializes in software development for measurement and control instruments. It is widely used in science and industrial research labs for designing and testing systems.

OPTI 471A Advanced Optics Laboratory

Beam alignment, data acquisition and signal processing, spectrometers, incoherent sources, thermal and photon detectors, array detectors, polarization, optical properties of materials, scanners and modulators, image acquisition and processing, properties of the eye.

OPTI 471B Advanced Optics Laboratory

Kerr and Pockels cells, liquid crystal light valves, measurement of optical fiber characteristics, signal transmission, Fourier transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, transmission, reflection, image and rainbow holograms.

OPTI 481A Innovation, Translation and Entrepreneurship

Where do new medical devices and therapeutic systems come from? In this course students will learn how one Innovates in the medical arena and how you take a concept of potential practical value and make it real. All the critical steps in medical innovation will be discussed.

OPTI 484 Polarized Light and Polarimetry

Polarized light and the Poincare sphere. Polarization in natural scenes and animal vision. Polarization elements: polarizers, retarders, and depolarizers. Jones and Mueller polarization calculus. Polarimetry: measuring the polarization properties of optical elements and materials. Polarization modulators and controllers. Polarization dependent loss and polarization mode dispersion in fiber optics. Advanced polarization issues in optical devices and systems.

OPTI 485 Illumination Engineering

Fields: Illumination, Nonimaging, and Concentrators; Sources: Incandescent, Fluorescent, LED, HID, Modeling, and Experimental Measurement; Modeling: Ray Tracing, Radiometry and Photometry, Color, Polarization, and Scattering; Theory: Radiometry, Photometry, Étendue, Skew Invariant, and Concentration; Design Methods: Edge Ray, Flow Line, Tailored Edge Ray, Non-Edge Ray, and Imaging; Optics: Reflectors, Lightpipes, Couplers, Films, and Hybrids; Applications: Displays, Automotive, Solar, Sources, and Lighting; Special Topics: Software Modeling, Optimization, Tolerancing, and Rendering.

OPTI 489 Optics Outreach

Students will explore a variety of methods for communicating with the general public about science and optics in particular. Students are expected to develop and apply the knowledge and skills useful for developing methods for communicating effectively with a wide range of audiences. The primary audience for applying the skills acquired in this course will be communicating with students in the high school setting.

OPTI 495B Information in a Photon

This course will develop the mathematical theory of noise in optical detection from first principles, with the goal of understanding the fundamental limits of efficiency with which one can extract information encoded in light. We will explore how optical-domain interferometric manipulations of the information bearing light, i.e., prior to the actual detection, and the use of detection-induced electro-optic feedback during the detection process can alter the post-detection noise statistics in a favorable manner, thereby facilitating improved efficiency in information extraction. Throughout the course, we will evaluate applications of such novel optical detection methods in optical communications and sensing, and compare their performance with those with conventional ways of detecting light. We will also compare the performance of these novel detection methods to the best performance achievable---in the given problem context---as governed by the laws of (quantum) physics, without showing explicit derivations of those fundamental quantum limits. The primary goal behind this course is to equip students (as well as interested postdocs and faculty) coming from a broad background who are considering taking on theoretical or experimental research in quantum enhanced photonic information processing, with intuitions on a deeper way to think of optical detection, and to develop an appreciation of: (1) the value of a full quantum treatment of light to find fundamental limits of encoding information in the photon, and (2) how pre-detection manipulation of the information-bearing light can help dispose it information favorably with respect to the inevitable detection noise.

This course will not assume any background in optics, stochastic processes, quantum mechanics, information theory or estimation theory. However, an undergraduate mathematical background and proficiency in complex numbers, probability theory, and linear algebra (vectors and matrices) will be assumed.

Graduate Level Course Descriptions

OPTI 501 Electromagnetic Waves

Vector fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic field energy, wave equation, polarized light, time average measurement, Fresnel equations, scalar and vector potentials, gauge transformations, dispersion, metal optics, crystal optics, dipole radiation, mathematical formalism of polarized light, guided waves.

OPTI 502 Optical Design and Instrumentation I

Rays and wavefronts, Snell's Law, mirror and prism systems, Gaussian imagery and cardinal points, paraxial ray tracing, stops and pupils, illumination systems, elementary optical systems, optical materials, dispersion, systems of thin prisms, system analysis using ray trace code, chromatic aberrations and achromatization, monochromatic aberrations, ray fans, spot diagrams, balancing of aberrations, aspheric systems.

OPTI 502L Fundamentals of Applied Optics Laboratory

Optical systems; Gaussian optics, aberrations, radiometry, sources, detectors, optical engineering.

OPTI 503 Optical Design and Instrumentation II

Aberrations of optical systems: wavefans and rayfans, spot diagrams, wavefront expansion, effects of aberrations on image quality, aberration balancing, image quality measures; Color: colorimetry, chromaticity, color gamut, additive and subtractive colors; Polarization Optics; Digital Imaging Systems: resolution and aliasing, color filter arrays, aliasing suppression, image displays and projectors; Diffractive Optical Elements: theory, diffraction efficiency, modeling, applications including achromatization.

OPTI 503A Mathematical Methods for Optics & Photonics

This course covers the basic mathematics needed for an in-depth understanding of the science and technology of fiber-optical communication systems. Every mathematical tool/technique developed in this course will first be motivated by the relevant application. The students are not expected to have a broad-based prior knowledge of the topics covered in this course, but they should generally be familiar with the basics of algebra, Euclidean geometry, trigonometry, integral and differential calculus, simple differential equations, and the rudiments of complex number analysis. The course will cover Complex Analysis, Fourier transform theory, and method of stationary phase (in the context of optical diffraction), vector algebra, linear algebra, ordinary and partial differential equations (e.g., Maxwell¿s electrodynamics, wave equation, diffusion equation), special functions (e.g., Bessel functions needed to study the guided modes of optical fibers), and probability theory (needed for understanding various sources of noise in communication systems, photodetection theory, digital communication via noisy channels, Information theory, etc.). Graduate-level requirements include completion of additional readings and additional problems on various homework assignments.

OPTI 504 Optical Spectroscopy of Materials

The course provides a survey of Optical Spectroscopic Methods and underlying phenomena for the study of materials. Graduate-level requirements include an individual research project with written report.

OPTI 505L Fundamentals of Physical Optics Laboratory

Laboratory in support of OPTI 501 and OPTI 505R.

OPTI 505R Diffraction and Interferometry

Interference and interferometry, concepts of coherence, holography, diffraction theory, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, volume diffraction, Gaussian beam propagation, optical transfer function, speckle.

OPTI 506 Radiometry, Sources, and Detectors

The generation, propagation, modification, detection and measurement of optical radiation and the design of radiometric systems. For graduate credit, graduate status and additional work will be required: The homework and the examinations will feature advanced problems for graduate students in the course.

OPTI 507 Solid-State Optics

Basic concepts in crystals and in optical response, optical properties of phonons and semiconductors, quantum wells, electro-optical properties of semiconductors, optical nonlinearities, solid state devices and laser diodes.

OPTI 508 Probability and Statistics in Optics

Probability theory, stochastic processes, noise, statistical optics, information theory, hypothesis testing, estimation, restoration.

OPTI 510R Photonics

Fundamentals of fiber and waveguide optics and applications to optical components and systems for fiber communication technology.

OPTI 511L Lasers and Solid-State Devices Laboratory

The experiments in this lab deal with a number of the subjects addressed in courses OPTI 511R, 541 and 507.

OPTI 511R Optical Physics and Lasers

Fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics; application to model quantum systems; interaction of light with atoms; perturbation theory; two-level atom approximation; nonlinear optics; pulsed and CW laser operation; thermal sources; optical detectors.

OPTI 512L Mathematical Optics Laboratory

Laboratory in support of OPTI 508 and OPTI 512R.

OPTI 512R Linear Systems, Fourier Transforms

Mathematical background, convolution, the Fourier transform, linear filtering and sampling, two-dimensional operations, diffraction, image formation.

OPTI 513L Optical Testing Laboratory

Measurement of paraxial properties of optical components, refractive index, surface figure, and surface finish.

OPTI 513R Optical Testing

Paraxial properties of optical systems, material qualification, ellipsometry, aberrations, basic interferometers, direct-phase measurement interferometry, measurement of surface quality, testing mirrors, windows, prisms and conercubes, measurement of index inhomogeneity, testing of spherical surfaces and lenses, aspheric testing, absolute measurements, system evaluation.

OPTI 514A Photovoltaic Solar Energy Systems

This course is intended to provide an introduction to the theory and operation of different types of photovoltaic devices, the characteristics of solar illumination, and the advantages and characteristics of concentrating and light management optics. The physical limits on photovoltaic cell performance and practical device operation will be analyzed. The main device emphasis will focus on different types of silicon photovoltaics including crystalline, amorphous, multi-crystalline, and thin film solar cells. An overview of other types of photovoltaic cells including multi-junction III-V, CdTe, CuInSe2, and organics will also be given. A discussion of radiometric and spectral properties of solar illumination will be presented and the impact of these factors on solar cell design will be explored. Techniques for increasing the performance of solar cells by light trapping, photon recycling, and anti-reflection coatings will be covered. The design and operation of imaging and non-imaging concentrators will also be discussed. Basic experiments related to PV cell measurements and the optical properties of concentrators are also planned for the course. Graduate-level requirements include a research report on a topic selected from the course material.

OPTI 516 Modern Astronomical Optics

This course provides an overview of astronomical optical systems and techniques for the observation of exoplanets. It introduces astronomical and optical concepts related to exoplanets observations. By focusing on a particularly challenging observational problem of modern astronomy, the course will teach design and analysis of ultra high precision optical systems and measurement techniques, including spectroscopy, photometry, optical metrology and interferometry. Graduate- level requirements include a 45 minute final oral examination.

OPTI 517 Lens Design

Fundamentals of optical system layout and design; exact and paraxial ray tracing; aberration theory; chromatic and monochromatic aberrations; use of computer programs in lens design.

OPTI 518 Introduction to Aberrations

Advanced first-order tools, chromatic aberrations, monochromatic aberrations, sources of aberration, computation, simple systems.

OPTI 521 Introductory Optomechanical Engineering

Optical materials, principles of opto-mechanical design, lens and mirror mounting, tolerancing, specification of optical components. Graduate-level requirements include independent projects.

OPTI 522 Contrast Agents, Molecular Imaging, and Kinetics

Current topics in drug discovery and molecular imaging involve the integration of a series of research modalities. The pharmaceutical Industry uses these modalities in their developmental and regulatory efforts to attain new indications. As well, the medical device community is continually developing new techniques to enhance medical imaging for the earliest detection of disease. Furthermore, kinetic ADME studies (absorbtion, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) are required so as to determine the fate of these agents as an indicator of efficacy and toxicity.

OPTI 523 Optomechanical Design and Analysis

Principles that were taught in OPTI 421/521 (Introductory Optomechanical Engineering) will be applied to develop designs and to perform detailed analysis of optomechanical systems. Graduate-level requirements include independent projects.

OPTI 524A Optical Systems Engineering

This class provides opportunities for students to learn practical engineering skills for developing optical systems. Students will work in groups on case studies that provide the opportunity to learn systems engineering skills firsthand. Some of the case studies will look at just the necessary requirements, others will include more detailed design, and two or more will be built by the students using off the shelf optics and mechanics. Some examples of optical applications that may be covered are imaging, spectroscopy, illumination, adaptive optics, communication, detection and metrology. These systems will be used to teach fundamentals of systems engineering, optical system design, quantifying performance for optical systems, debugging hardware and professional engineering skills. Graduate-level requirements include more assignments. Their role in the groups will be highly substantive in comparison to undergraduate student group student roles.

OPTI 527 Holography and Diffractive Optics

This course describes the nature of holographic and lithographically formed diffraction gratings and the tools necessary for their design and analysis. Course topics include a description of the interference and Fourier relations that determine the amplitude of diffracted fields, analysis of volume gratings, properties of holographic recording materials, computer generated holograms, binary gratings, analysis of applications of holography including data storage, imaging systems, photovoltaic energy systems, polarization control elements, and associative memories. We will also have a number of lab demonstrations fabricating holograms in a new type of photopolymer.

OPTI 530 Optical Communication Systems

Physics of optical communication components and applications to communication systems. Topics include fiber attenuation and dispersion, laser modulation, photo detection and noise, receiver design, bit error rate calculations, and coherent communications. Graduate-level requirements include additional homework and a term paper.

OPTI 534 Advanced Topics in Optical and Electronic Materials

Topics to be selected from opto-electronics, wave guides, non-linear optics, nano-materials and semiconductor materials

OPTI 536 Introduction to Image Science

This course provides an introduction to the general field of image science. The course provides both an overview of the many application domains of imaging in the physical and biological sciences including biological imaging, astronomy, remote sensing, metrology, and industrial inspection and an in-depth review of the applications of medical imaging. The course is intended for graduate students interested in or working in any area of imaging.

OPTI 537 Imaging Physics and Devices

Overview of basic physical principles and specific devices of use in imaging systems. Sources of light and other radiation, propagation of radiant energy, interaction of light and matter, photocathodes and photoelectronic imaging devices, semiconductor physics and devices. The course is intended for graduate students interested in any area of imaging.

OPTI 539A From Photonics Innovation to the Marketplace

This course covers the process of technology development in the photonics industry, both from the perspective of formal processes and case studies. Key aspects of the commercialization process including intellectual property, new product development processes, technical marketing and team building are treated in an interactive program informed by the instructor's 15 years of industry experience in both large corporate R&D organizations and entrepreneurial startups. Graduate-level requirements include completing an executive summary of their business plan/invention disclosure project that is a portion of the Group Gate 2 presentation grade.grade.

OPTI 544 Foundations of Quantum Optics

Foundations of quantum optics, interaction of two-level atoms with light; basic elements of laser theory; fundamental consequences of the quantization of the light field; introduction to modern topics in quantum optics.

OPTI 547 The Beam Propagation Method

Wave equations for propagation in dielectric media, solutions using the beam propagation method based on spectral (Fourier, Hankel transforms) and finite difference methods, with emphasis on thorough understanding of both the underlying physics and numerical simulation principles.

OPTI 553 Nonlinear Photonics

Enables students to use advanced optical waveguide analysis with knowledge of physics of nonlinear optics to understand, design and test nonlinear photonics devices. Balances treatment of advanced topics in optical waveguide theory. Introduces nonlinear optics, with emphasis being placed on technologically significant nonlinear photonics phenomena and devices.

OPTI 556 Computational Imaging

Computational imaging consists of joint design of measurement strategy and estimation algorithms for image formation from radiation fields. This course reviews principles of forward model and inversion algorithms for computational imaging and analyzes imaging systems for geometric, wave and statistical radiation field models. Forward models, consisting of discrete representations of continuous image and measurement spaces, are fundamental to computational imaging. The course reviews how to form and evaluate such models. Since convolutional neural networks are the most important tool in modern inverse models, their use and application in concert with linear and regularized regression is explored. Coded aperture and structured illumination systems are considered for X-ray imaging, phase retrieval, and decompressive estimation are discussed for wave fields and multiaperture and multiframe estimation strategies are discussed for statistical fields.

OPTI 557 Laser Engineering and Applications

Laser engineering is a broad and interdisciplinary field that encompasses atomic and molecular physics, electromagnetism, nonlinear optics, mechanical design, thermodynamics, software, as well as economic and legal aspects. It is a very dynamic and rapidly evolving field that has been on the cutting edge of science and technology since the first operational laser was demonstrated in 1960 and continues to be such to this day. This one-semester, graduate-level course covers basic and applied aspects involved in the operation, design, characterization, and applications of lasers and laser systems. The course provides the students with practically applicable information essential for the educated use and design of various types of lasers in the laboratory and industrial settings. The course will self-consistently introduce the basic notation and principles involved in the operation of the laser and in the properties and characterization of radiation it generates. Different modes of laser operation will be covered, including continuous-wave, Q-switched, and mode-locked regimes. Various specific laser systems will be discussed including gas lasers, diode lasers, solid-state lasers, fiber lasers, as well as large-scale installation such as the National Ignition Facility in the US and the Extreme Light Infrastructure in Europe.

OPTI 560 Quantum nanophotonics

This course will introduce the field of quantum nanophotonics: how to implement quantum technology and quantum information processing based on integrated photonic circuits. Different nanophotonic devices for quantum light control will be introduced. The methods to generate quantum states of light, manipulate light at quantum level with different degrees of freedoms, and detect quantum states of light with various approaches will be covered. Major achievements and future challenges in the field will be discussed. This course aims to provide basic knowledge about quantum nanophotonics from experiment prospective to students from broad backgrounds including quantum/classical photonics, quantum information theory, atomic physics, etc.

OPTI 567 Nanophotonics

This course will cover the interaction of light with nano-scale features on objects. Ways to focus light and image objects beyond the diffraction limit will be presented. The course will include mathematical foundations, including those of plasmonics and metamaterials, as well as a review of applications of nanophotonics and recently-published progress in the field.

OPTI 569L System Programming for Engineers

The course aims to teach entry to intermediate level software development skills in the LabVIEW programming environment.

LabVIEW is a graphic programming environment that specializes in software development for measurement and control instruments. It is widely used in science and industrial research labs for designing and testing systems.

Graduate student will have additional components on homework, including: code readability, program architecture, and the quality of user interface.

OPTI 570 Quantum Mechanics

This is a one-semester course designed to provide students with a solid understanding of quantum mechanics formalism, techniques, and important example problems. With this background, students will be prepared for subsequent in-depth studies in optical physics, quantum optics, relativistic quantum mechanics and other advanced quantum mechanics topics, condensed matter physics, laser physics, and semiconductor physics and optics. The course emphasizes a formal mathematical treatment of quantum mechanics, and is therefore intended for students who have already completed at least a one-semester course in quantum mechanics where the basic concepts, symbols, and mathematical approaches have been introduced.

OPTI 571L Optical Physics Computational Lab

This course will introduce students to using computers for solving quantum mechanics and optical physics problems of relevance to optical physics. This computation lab course consists of weekly 1-hour lectures and weekly assignments to be completed independently by students and turned in for credit. The computational projects include topics that are discussed in OPTI 570, and topics that build from those covered in OPTI 570. The course is designed to be taken by students after completion of OPTI 570, rather than concurrently with OPTI 570.

OPTI 574 Physical Optics Modeling

This course examines the use of physical optics modeling software to analyze systems not well modelled by exact raytracing code. Specifically, the course will focus on modern AR/VR which combine waveguides, gratings, and holograms to introduce images into the eye. Physical optics modeling software, VirtualLab Fusion, will be used to analyze these more complex systems to provide the student a background in both this class of software, as well as AR/VR systems.

OPTI 581A Assessing Early Stage Medical Technologies for Commercial Potential

Where do new medical devices and therapeutic systems come from? In this course students will learn how one Innovates in the medical arena and how you take a concept of potential practical value and make it real. All the critical steps in medical innovation will be discussed. Graduate-level requirements include graduate students serving as team leaders.

OPTI 584 Polarized Light and Polarimetry

Polarized light and the Poincare sphere. Polarization in natural scenes and animal vision. Polarization elements: polarizers, retarders, and depolarizers. Jones and Mueller polarization calculus. Polarimetry: measuring the polarization properties of optical elements and materials. Polarization modulators and controllers. Polarization dependent loss and polarization mode dispersion in fiber optics. Advanced polarization issues in optical devices and systems.

OPTI 585 Illumination Engineering

Fields: Illumination, Nonimaging, and Concentrators; Sources: Incandescent, Fluorescent, LED, HID, Modeling, and Experimental Measurement; Modeling: Ray Tracing, Radiometry and Photometry, Color, Polarization, and Scattering; Theory: Radiometry, Photometry, Étendue, Skew Invariant, and Concentration; Design Methods: Edge Ray, Flow Line, Tailored Edge Ray, Non-Edge Ray, and Imaging; Optics: Reflectors, Lightpipes, Couplers, Films, and Hybrids; Applications: Displays, Automotive, Solar, Sources, and Lighting; Special Topics: Software Modeling, Optimization, Tolerancing, and Rendering. Graduate-level requirements include decidedly more involved project than that for undergraduates. Additionally, the final design review requirements are more extensive.

OPTI 586 Polarization in Optical Design

Principals of the calculation of polarization effects in optical systems; Geometrical optics; Polarization ray tracing. Polarization aberration function. Examples of polarization aberrations.

OPTI 586L Polarization in Optical Design Lab

Polarization optical design software principals. Calculation of polarization effects in optical systems; Geometrical optics; Polarization ray tracing. Polarization aberration function. Examples of polarization aberrations.

OPTI 587L Photonic Communications Laboratory

This course is designed to provide the hands-on experience needed to master the basic concepts and laboratory techniques of optical fiber technology.

OPTI 588 Introduction to Display Science & Technology

The class examines the fundamentals of 2D and 3D display technologies (e.g. human visual system, color and depth perception, color theory and metrology, and state-of-the-art display technologies), display performance evaluation and calibration, and display research frontiers. The class is suited for both graduate and undergraduate students. You are encouraged to talk to the Instructor to find out if this is the right course for you.

OPTI 589 Optics Outreach

Students will explore a variety of methods for communicating with the general public about science and optics in particular. Students are expected to develop and apply the knowledge and skills useful for developing methods for communicating effectively with a wide range of audiences. The primary audience for applying the skills acquired in this course will be communicating with students in the high school setting. Graduate-level requirements include an independent project.

OPTI 590 Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth

Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth introduces basic and applied remote sensing science as a means to explore the diversity of our planetary environments (biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere) within the radiometric, spectral, spatial, angular and temporal domains of remote sensing systems. This survey course strikes a balance between theory, applications and hands-on labs and assignments. We explore how you can download, process, analyze and interpret multi-sensor data and integrate online remotely sensed data sources/products into your research of interest.

OPTI 595A Current Subjects in Optical Sciences

Discussion of current research topics in Optics by Optical Sciences colloquium speakers.

OPTI 595B Information in a Photon

This course will develop the mathematical theory of noise in optical detection from first principles, with the goal of understanding the fundamental limits of efficiency with which one can extract information encoded in light. We will explore how optical-domain interferometric manipulations of the information bearing light, i.e., prior to the actual detection, and the use of detection-induced electro-optic feedback during the detection process can alter the post-detection noise statistics in a favorable manner, thereby facilitating improved efficiency in information extraction. Throughout the course, we will evaluate applications of such novel optical detection methods in optical communications and sensing, and compare their performance with those with conventional ways of detecting light. We will also compare the performance of these novel detection methods to the best performance achievable---in the given problem context---as governed by the laws of (quantum) physics, without showing explicit derivations of those fundamental quantum limits. The primary goal behind this course is to equip students (as well as interested postdocs and faculty) coming from a broad background who are considering taking on theoretical or experimental research in quantum enhanced photonic information processing, with intuitions on a deeper way to think of optical detection, and to develop an appreciation of: (1) the value of a full quantum treatment of light to find fundamental limits of encoding information in the photon, and (2) how pre-detection manipulation of the information-bearing light can help dispose it information favorably with respect to the inevitable detection noise.

OPTI 597A Optical Shop Practices

Experience with various techniques to produce optical surfaces--a sphere, a flat, or a paraboloid. These surfaces can be used as the mail components of a simple telescope of four inches aperture. The emphasis of the course is to produce actual elements be applying abstract optical concepts.

OPTI 600G Laser Beams and Resonators

Starting from the ray optical treatment of first-order optical systems this class develops the ideas and approaches underpinning the properties of laser beam propagation and its application to optical resonators. Topics range from ABCD ray transfer matrices, classification and stability of optical resonators, to the properties of a variety of common optical resonators. The goal of the class is to provide the students with the skills to analyze basic laser beam propagation and resonator properties.

OPTI 613 Introduction to Infrared Systems

This courses provides the background, theory, and practice of how to design, analyze, and test high performance infrared imaging systems. The course is presented in three sections. The first section provides a brief review of the basic mathematics, radiometry, and diffraction theory needed to be successful in imaging system performance calculations. The second section includes a detailed look at all the components that make up an electro-optical or infrared imaging system to include targets, atmospherics, optics, detectors, electronics, signal and image processing, displays and the human visual system. The student is taught how to calculate the component resolution (modulation transfer function) and sensitivity for each of the components. Modulation Transfer Functions and optical throughput along with signal-to-noise is determined for each imaging system component. The student is taught how to determine whether a system is turbulence-limited, detector-limited, diffraction or aberration-limited, display-limited, or human vision system limited. The third section teaches the student how to combine all the component transfer functions and throughput (with infrared radiation) to determine the imaging system contrast threshold function. This system CTF is used in the design of imaging systems to accomplish some object discrimination task (e.g., detection, recognition, or identification). System theory, laboratory performance, and field performance are covered. These concepts apply to both infrared and electro-optical imaging system performance.

OPTI 617 Practical Optical System Design

Fundamentals of optical design methods and discussions of commonly used optical systems. Covers principles, design methods, and design examples for each system. Students will design one complete optical system.

OPTI 630 Biomedical Optics and Biophotonics

[Taught alternate years beginning Fall 2004]. This course covers the basic optical principles, techniques, and instruments used in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It includes in-depth coverage of optical imaging and spectroscopy systems for biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, details of light interaction with tissue, and advanced optical therapeutic instruments and techniques. The course describes commercial devices and instruments as well as new devices and instruments under development for novel applications. This course is intended for advanced graduate students in optical sciences or engineering with a suitable background in optics and imaging.

OPTI 636 Noise in Imaging Systems

Development of mathematical tools for describing stochastic processes in single optical detectors and complex imaging systems; understanding the effect of image processing and reconstruction algorithms on image noise; development of a quantitative approach to assessing and optimizing image quality.

OPTI 637 Principles of Image Science

Mathematical description of imaging systems and noise; introduction to inverse problems; introduction to statistical decision theory; prior information; image reconstruction and radon transform; image quality; applications in medical imaging; other imaging systems.

OPTI 646 Introduction to Quantum Information and Computation

The course covers the foundations of quantum information and selected topics in quantum communication and quantum components, including physical implementations.

OPTI 647 Photonic Quantum Information Processing

This course is for students who intend to partake theoretical or experimental research in any area of photonic quantum information processing, such as quantum communications, sensing and computation. The course will be aimed at developing a principled understanding of classical and non-classical light, and the generation, manipulation and detection of non-classical light. As application of material learnt in the course, examples will be drawn from important applications of photonic quantum information processing, such as linear optical quantum computing, quantum repeaters for entanglement distribution, and quantum sensing.

OPTI 696A Advanced Lens Design

Introduction to the design process; use of computers in design; definition of design parameters; ray tracing methods; review of Gaussian Optics layout of lens systems.

OPTI 792 Directed Introductory Graduate Research

This course is designed to aid PhD students in their search and selection of a research area and research advisor by incorporating research activities into the first year of the Optical Sciences PhD program. In this course, students select a faculty advisor who will supervise a research project and assign a grade at the end of the semester based on student performance in the course. For their research project, students may select from various options, including (but not limited to): assisting with an ongoing research project, creating and working on their own research project under their supervisor's guidance or the guidance of another mentor such as a more senior graduate student, choosing rotations through multiple research groups (in which case multiple single-credit research courses with different supervisors might be taken in a single semester), or theoretical or computational investigation into fundamental aspects of science and engineering that underlie specific research areas or specific projects.